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Spike for Peace: Indonesia beats Brazil for bronze

By: - Reporter / @BLozadaINQ
/ 07:34 PM December 03, 2015
Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.net

Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.net

Indonesia took the bronze medal after a three-set thriller over Brazil, 21-16, 19-21, 15-8, in the inaugural Spike for Peace invitational beach volleyball tournament Thursday at Philsports Arena.

It was a sorry miss for Brazil’s Mimi Ameral as her shot at the 14-8 mark, with the Indonesians leading in the third set, went long to seal Indonesia’s win.

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Dini Jasita Utami Putu and partner Juliana Dhita, who were the champions in the 2015 Asia-Pacific Beach Volleyball Tournament, also took home $4,000. Putu had 30 points for Indonesia while Dhita had 15.

Japan beat Indonesia in the semifinal round to advance to the gold medal match. Brazil lost in their semi match to Sweded.

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Bruna Figueiredo had 21 points for Brazil while Ameral had 14.

Putu put Indonesia in match point, 14-8, with her tap down the middle of the court that caught the Brazilian defense off guard.

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TAGS: Beach Volleyball, Brazil, Indonesia, Japan, Spike For Peace, Sweden, Volleyball
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